The Many Colors of Tropical Hibiscus

Living in semi-tropical central Florida with the hot, humid summer requires tropical plants in the garden. Tropical hibiscus are favorites in my area. I see them planted nearly everywhere. They are planted by the pharmacy drive-through, by the windows at fast food restaurants, by libraries and city hall. Today I’m sharing hibiscus photos from past posts.

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Last Day of April in The Garden

Plumeria is a genus of flowering plants in the dogbane family, Apocynaceae. Most species are deciduous shrubs or small trees. The tropical species are indigenous to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and as far south as Brazil, but are grown as cosmopolitan ornamentals in warm regions. Common names for plants in the genus vary widely but Frangipani or variations on that theme are the most common.

Yesterday I went into the front yard checking my plants around 10 AM. The sky was blue with white clouds and the temperature was about 81 degrees F.

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Early Plumeria Flowers

Plumeria is a genus of flowering plants in the dogbane family, Apocynaceae. Most species are deciduous shrubs or small trees. The tropical species are indigenous to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and as far south as Brazil, but are grown as cosmopolitan ornamentals in warm regions. Common names for plants in the genus vary widely but Frangipani or variations on that theme are the most common.

April is still the dry season here in Central Florida with few rainy days and lots of blue skies.

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March Flowers 2021

Most hibiscus are single hibiscus with 5 leaves.  Thanks to modern cultivation techniques, some varieties can produce flowers with more than five petals – called “double hibiscus” – in a dazzling array of colors, sizes, and shapes. They grow in semi-tropical and tropical growing zones here in the U. S.  (zones 9 to 11)

 

A couple of weeks ago I shared peach double hibiscus blooming in the back yard after a rain here in central Florida.  When the northern states got snow last week, we got a cooler front with rain.

 

 

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Rain Brings Flowers

Late fall through late spring is the dry season here in central Florida.  Some years we still have a decent amount of rain, but most years it is not often enough.  My yard has some tropical plants, like tropical hibiscus, that with rain will burst into blooms year round.   One such hibiscus is my peach double hibiscus.   Most hibiscus are single hibiscus with 5 leaves.  Thanks to modern cultivation techniques, some varieties can produce flowers with more than five petals – called “double hibiscus” – in a dazzling array of colors, sizes, and shapes. They grow in semi-tropical and tropical growing zones here in the U. S.  (zones 9 to 11)

 

 

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